Category Archives: Systems

Next language translated to 100%

Special thanks to alaks who made Czech the sixth language which is now available with a 100% translation rate. In addition I want to thank all translators who did a tremendous work over the past years.

To show how far the various languages have been translated here a short statistic overview covering languages with more than 30% of progress

Language Progress
Spanish 100%
German 100%
French 100%
Italian 100%
Dutch 100%
Czech 100%
Portuguese (Brazil) 83%
Swedish 64%
Hungarian 43%
Finnish 37%
Japanese 36%

It would be great if even more people could be helping to translate the software. We are especially looking for Portuguese (Brazil), Swedish, Hungarian, Finnish, Japanese. Of course any help for the other languages that CAcert is offering is appreciated.

If you want to help just create an account on CAcert’s translation server
http://translations.cacert.org

For more information look at
https://wiki.cacert.org/Translations
or join the translation mailing list
https://lists.cacert.org/wws/info/cacert-translations

Thanks to all who already helped with the translation!

CAcert Community Agreement (CCA) Rollout finished

[German Version below]
A long lasting software project – the CCA rollout – is nearing its end!

With today’s software update the last step for the CCA Rollout was deployed.

From now on every member who wants to use his CAcert account needs to have his CCA acceptance recorded.

The software has already been tracking this for some time which means that most active members will have their acceptance recorded by now. The CCA acceptance is recorded when:
– creating a new account
– entering an assurance for the assurer and the assuree
– creating a new certificate (client, server, GPG)

THE NEWS is that, for all users for whom no acceptance is yet recorded, a redirect to the CCA acceptance page is now forced. Once the CCA acceptance is recorded, this page will not be shown again.

Some historical facts:
The foundation was laid in 2007 by developing the policies and the CCA. The rollout started in 2009 by introducing the CCA to the community. In summer 2009 the acceptance of the CCA was required for creating a new account but it was not recorded.
In 2012 the acceptance of the CCA was required while entering an assurance but it was not recorded.
Starting from September 2013 the acceptance is recorded both on creating an account and while issuing a new certificate.
Since January 2014 the acceptance is recorded when entering an assurance too.
In September 2014 a new CCA was accepted by Policy Group.

[German Version]
Ein lange währendes Software-Projekt – der CCA-Rollout – nähert sich dem Ende!

Mit dem heutigen Software-Update wurde der letzte Schritt des CCA-Rollouts vollzogen.

Ab sofort wird für jedes Mitglied beim Login abgefragt, ob die Zustimmung zur CCA vorliegt. Falls nicht wird diese beim Anmelden erfragt und eingetragen.

Die Software zeichnet schon seit einiger Zeit bei diversen Aktionen die CCA-Zustimmung auf:
– Anlegen eines neuen Benutzerkontos
– Beim Eintragen einer Assurance sowohl für den Assurer und den Assuree
– Beim Erstellen eines neuen Zertifikats (Client, Server, GPG)

Wichtig: ab jetzt muss jeder User, dessen Zustimmung zur CCA noch nicht aufgezeichnet wurde, der CCA einmalig explizit zustimmen. Liegt bereits eine aufgezeichnete Zustimmung zur CCA vor, entfällt die explizite Aufforderung zur Zustimmung.

Einige historische Angaben:
Gestartet wurde das Projekt im Jahr 2007 mit dem Erstellen der Policy-Dokumente und der CCA. Das Rollout wurde 2009 mit der Veröffentlichung der CCA begonnen.
Ab dem Sommer 2009 wurde die Zustimmung zur CCA beim Anlegen eines neuen Kontos verpflichtend. Diese Zustimmung wurde allerdings nicht aufgezeichnet.
Seit 2012 wurde die Zustimmung zur CCA Bestandteil der Assurance. Diese Zustimmung wurde nicht in der Software aufgezeichnet.
Ab September 2013 wurde die Zustimmung zur CCA beim Anlegen eines neuen Kontos und bei der Erzeugung eines Zertifikats aufgezeichnet.
Seit Januar 2014 wird die Zustimmung auch beim Eintragen einer Assurance protokolliert.
Im September 2014 wurde eine neue Version der CCA durch die Policy Gruppe verabschiedet.

Disabling SSL3 and 3DES support to improve security for CAcert’s users

CAcert intends to disable SSL3 and 3DES support for its main website www.cacert.org by December 1, 2014.

The main CAcert website is currently still supporting the SSL3 protocol for secure connections. However, in https://www.openssl.org/~bodo/ssl-poodle.pdf  it is shown that SSL3 is susceptible to certain cryptograhical attacks. While www.cacert.org does support the recommended TLS_FALLBACK_SCSV option to protect clients with that same protocol option against unintended downgrades to SSL3, this still leaves plain old SSL3 clients vulnerable for the new attack.

Similarly, www.cacert.org is currently still supporting the 3DES cipher suite for encyrpting secure connections. However, this provides only 112 bits of security, which is below the currently recommended number of 128. Hence we should disable it to protect CAcert’s clients.

In practice, the only client known to negotiate SSL3 with www.cacert.org is Internet Explorer 6.0 as found in Windows XP. Thus disabling SSL3 will block https access for these clients only. Similarly, 3DES will only be negotiated by IE 6 and IE 8 running on Windows XP. Since Windows XP is no longer supported by its vendor, and the widely circulated advice to all its users is to switch to a more recent operating system (or switch at least to a more current browser), announcing termination of support for SSL3 and 3DES by CAcert on December 1, 2014 does not seem unreasonable, and is fully in line with our mission to support the security of its users.

If you want to discuss this issue further, please use the bug tracker created for this issue (https://bugs.cacert.org/view.php?id=1314).

Downtime for www.cacert.org on July 23, 2014

On July 23, the CAcert webdb server will be unavailable for most services from 10:00 CEST until approximately 11:30 CEST.

The reason for this is the need to convert the database from MyISAM format to InnoDB format, to address https://bugs.cacert.org/view.php?id=1172

We cannot predict exactly how long this conversion will last, but it is estimated to be less than 90 minutes. During this time, the server will remain up and running. The web frontend will also remain up and running, but with very limited functionality only (no user logins), due to the database being offline.

We apologize for any inconvenience caused by this major but necessary operation.

Change when adding an assurance

The software team pushed a new patch to production that has an impact on the way how new assurances have to be entered into the system.

Starting today, besides entering the primary email address further information has to be provided in order to gain access to assurance relevant data of the assuree. Additionally the date of birth of the assuree has to be stated by the assurer, before any data of the assuree is displayed for the assurance process.

This change was made for data protection reasons to ensure nobody is able gain access to personal data entrusted to CAcert by mere guessing of email addresses.

It hopefully will also reduce the number of problems with assurances that contain a wrong date of births.

Selection of hash algorithm during certificate creation

[German version below]
The software team recently released a patch which enables users to choose the hash algorithm used during the creation of a new certificate. Since the deprecation of SHA-1 earlier this year only certificates using SHA-512 for the signature could be issued. Now the available choices have been extended to SHA-256, SHA384 and SHA-512 where SHA-256 is the current default. Due to some organisational issues, the choice of SHA-384 will for now silently use SHA-512 instead.

The default hash algorithm has been selected as SHA-256 for compatibility with Debian systems using GNU TLS 2.12, which fails to operate correctly when a certificate signed with anything but SHA-256 has been used. This decision may be reviewed in the near future once the new Debian (Jessie) is released.

The move away from SHA-1 had to be made as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) disallowed certificates with SHA-1 algorithm issued after 2013-12-31 [1]. If your software still needs a SHA-1 signed certificate, get in contact with your vendor and request a software update, to cope with SHA-2 signatures. The use of SHA-1 had been deprecated since 2011.

N.B.: The software team still needs your help to test the remaining parts of the patch and get it released in a timely manner. The same is true for all our other patches that are waiting to be released. Feel free to drop by in the IRC channel or ask your questions on our mailing list.

[1] http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-131A/sp800-131A.pdf;

[German]
Das Software-Team hat einen Patch herausgegeben, der es Nutzern erlaubt, die Stärke des bei der Erstellung des Zertifikates benutzten Hash-Algorithmus auszuwählen. Seit Anfang des Jahres ist die Nutzung von SHA-1 geächtet. Daher wurden die Zertifikate bisher mit SHA-512 ausgestellt. Jetzt stehen die Algorithmen SHA-256, SHA-384 und SHA-512 zur Auswahl, mit SHA-256 als Standardeinstellung. Aus organisatorischen Gründen, benutzt SHA-384 intern derzeit allerdings noch SHA-512.

Der Standard-Hash-Algorithmus wurde mit SHA-256 gewählt, um kompatibel mit Debian-Systemen zu sein, die noch GnuTLS 2.12 nutzen und Schwierigkeiten haben andere, als mit SHA-256 signierte Zertifikate zu verwenden. Diese Vorgabe wird überarbeitet werden, sobald das nächste Debian (Jessie) veröffentlicht wird.

Der Wechsel weg von SHA-1 wurde notwendig, da Zertifikate, die nach dem 2013-12-31 ausgestellt werden und SHA-1 nutzen, vom National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) als unsicher eingestuft werden [1]. Falls Ihre Software noch ein Zertifikat mit SHA-1 erfordert, fragen Sie bei dem Hersteller Ihrer Software nach, warum die Software noch nicht angepasst wurde, da SHA-1 bereits seit 2011 nicht mehr eingesetzt werden sollte.

P.S.: Das Software-Team benötigt weiterhin Unterstützung, um die verbleibenden Teile dieser Änderung zu testen, damit diese zeitnah freigegeben werden können. Das gleiche gilt auch für weitere Änderungen, die auf ihre Freigabe warten. Jeder ist eingeladen, sich in unserem IRC-Channel zu melden oder auf unserer Mailingliste seine Fragen loszuwerden.

Updated: Information about Heartbleed-bug in OpenSSL 1.0.1 up to 1.0.1f

German version below

There is news about a bug in OpenSSL that may allow an attacker to leak arbitrary information from any process using OpenSSL.

Good news:

Certificates issued by CAcert are not broken and our central systems did not leak your keys.

Bad news:

Even then you may be affected.
Although your keys were not leaked by CAcert your keys on your own infrastructure systems might have been compromised if you were or are running a vulnerable version of OpenSSL.

To elaborate on this:

The central systems of CAcert and our root certificates are not affected by this issue. Regrettably some of our infrastructure systems were affected by the bug. We are working to fix them and already completed work for the most critical ones. If you logged into those systems, within the last two years, (see list below) you might be affected!
But unfortunately given the nature of this bug we have to assume that the certificates of our members may be affected, if they were used in an environment with a publically accessable OpenSSL connection (e.g. Apache webserver, mail server, Jabber-Server, …). The bug has been open in OpenSSL for two years – from December 2011 and was introduced in stable releases starting with OpenSSL 1.0.1.
When an attacker can reach a vulnerable service he can abuse the TLS heartbeat extension to retrieve arbitrary chunks of memory by exploiting a missing bounds check. This can lead to disclosure of your private keys, resident session keys and other key material as well as all volatile memory contents of the server process like passwords, transmitted user data (e.g. web content) as well as other potentially confidential information.
Exploiting this bug does not leave any noticeable traces, thus for any system which is (or has been) running a vulnerable version of OpenSSL you must assume that at least your used server keys are compromised and therefore must be replaced by newly generated ones. Simply renewing existing certificates is not sufficient! – Please generate NEW keys with at least 2048 bit RSA or stronger!
As mentioned above this bug can be used to leak passwords and thus you should consider changing your login credentials to potentially compromised systems as well as any other system where those credentials might have been used as soon as possible.
An (incomplete) list of commonly used software which include or link to OpenSSL can be found at related apps.

What to do?

  • First ensure that you upgrade your system to a fixed OpenSSL version (1.0.1g or above).
  • Only then create new keys for your certificates.
  • Check what services you have used that may have been affected within the last two years.
  • Wait until you think that those environments got fixed.
  • Then (and only then) change your credentials for those services. If you do it too early, i.e. before the sites got fixed, your data may be leaked, again. So be careful when you do this.

What we are doing:

  • We are updating the affected infrastructure systems and and create new certificates for them.
  • We use this opportunity to upgrade to 4096 bit RSA keys signed with SHA-512. The new fingerprints can be found below. 😉
  • We will contact all members, who had active server certificates within the last two years.
  • We will keep you updated, here.

Press release

CAcert-PM-Heartbleed-en

Update:

There is a website where one can check if a domain is affected:
http://filippo.io/Heartbleed/ (Use on your own risk)
We checked our systems against it, it looks like most of the systems we classified as affected are not actually affected. But we decided to update them, anyway and provide them with new certificates, as well.

Status of CAcert Infrastructure systems:

Not affected / Nicht betroffen:

  • main website (www.cacert.org)
  • certificate signer (the system doing the actual certificate issuing)
  • email system (inbound and outbound mail servers)

Fixed/Behoben:

blog.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=7A:13:19:98:1E:FB:9F:F9:9A:E6:3D:E5:7D:F0:42:E1:BE:56:B9:79

board.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=9B:30:44:3D:A8:8C:F5:5E:50:07:68:70:D6:A1:83:44:F9:7D:00:D6

bugs.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=E1:2C:12:7F:66:DF:2E:9D:F6:BC:FB:6F:BC:F1:2E:A0:10:5F:8E:BA

cats.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=2E:0B:08:6E:F1:48:FB:76:69:D6:6D:51:8F:E9:B3:2C:C3:4B:14:25

community.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=9B:8E:0A:68:96:E5:C8:E6:E6:8E:D8:10:31:3F:7C:2C:A8:4E:E1:3F

email.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=27:AB:9B:90:51:9B:BA:60:51:B3:84:54:FF:C7:09:94:63:86:68:FA

git.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=87:47:41:6D:C1:32:C7:22:00:E5:DA:E5:3C:4B:28:A2:2B:8A:F3:E4

irc.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=57:F4:0F:38:1E:53:D0:83:DC:D2:40:0A:13:98:B7:06:55:EA:A7:19

issue.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=82:33:D3:AE:32:56:C5:AD:9E:BF:D1:84:62:56:EA:95:31:7E:64:8C

lists.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=6A:AE:16:90:A2:1F:CC:1B:B7:93:71:C0:1B:BD:2E:14:68:69:45:EA

svn.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=D5:00:0A:15:17:04:2F:50:5B:09:3C:DD:B9:0A:57:DD:B3:BE:3D:B4

translations.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=B7:59:B9:BA:46:64:E2:D4:C8:73:20:50:45:9B:08:5E:2B:DF:D0:1B

wiki.cacert.org
SHA1 Fingerprint=87:07:59:30:30:64:27:15:6E:39:C3:66:09:CA:7A:90:7D:2F:32:32

cacert.eu
SHA1 Fingerprint=A2:7A:CB:E7:91:0A:ED:7E:63:9F:D1:97:01:96:E9:7B:F0:9E:43:3D

Affected/Betroffen:

  • Testserver-management-system (you should have not used correct data there)

Deutsche Fassung:
Ein Bug in OpenSSL wurde gefunden, der es einem Angreifer erlaubt beliebige Informationen jedes Prozesses zu erlangen, der OpenSSL nutzt.

Die gute Nachricht:

Die von CAcert ausgestellten Zertifikate sind nicht kaputt und unsere zentralen Systeme waren auch nicht angreifbar und hat keine Schlüssel verraten.

Die schlechte Nachricht:

Dennoch kann jeder betroffen sein!

Um ins Detail zu gehen:

Die zentralen Systeme und die Stammzertifikate von CAcert sind von diesem Problem nicht betroffen. Leider sind einige unserer Infrastruktur-Systeme durch den Fehler betroffen.
Wir arbeiten daran diese zu fixen und haben dies auch schon für die meisten erledigt. Jeder, der sich auf diese Systeme in den letzten zwei Jahre eingelogt hat kann betroffen sein!
Aufgrund der Art des Fehlers, müssen wir leider davon ausgehen, dass die Zertifikate unserer Mitglieder betroffen sind, wenn sie sich in eine Umgebung eingelogt haben, die über öffentliche OpenSSL-Verbindungen zugänglich war (z.B. Apache Webserver, Mail Server, Jaber-Server, …). Dieser Fehler war zwei Jahre lang in OpenSSL – seit Dezember 2011 – und kam beginnend mit Version 1.0.1 in die Stabilen Versionen.
Angreifer, die einen verwundbaren Service erreichen, können die TLS-Erweiterung “heartbeat” ausnutzen, um beliebige Abschnitte aus dem Speicher zu erlangen, indem sie eine fehlende Bereichsprüfung ausnutzen. Das kann zur Offenlegung von privaten Schlüsseln, im Speicher abgelegte Sitzungsschlüsseln, sonstige Schlüssel genauso wie jeglicher weiterer Speicherinhalt des Server-Prozesses wie Passwörter oder übermittelte Benutzerdaten (z.B. Webinhalte) oder andere vertrauliche Informationen führen.
Die Ausnutzung dieses Fehlers hinterlässt keine merklichen Spuren. Daher muss für jedes System, auf dem eine angreifbare Version von OpenSSL läuft (oder lief), angenommen werden, dass zumindest die verwendeten Server-Zertifikate kompromittiert sind und deswegen durch einen NEU generierte erstetzt werden müssen. Einfach die alten Zertifikate zu erneuern, reicht nicht aus! – Bitte NEUE Schlüssel mit 2048 Bit RSA oder stärker generieren!
Wie oben erwähnt kann dieser Fehler ausgenutzt werden, um Passwörter zu entwenden. Daher sollte jeder überlegen, alle Zugangsdaten zu möglicherweise betroffenen Systemen und allen Systemen bei denen diese sonst noch verwendet worden sein können, so bald wie möglich auszutauschen.
Eine (unvollständige) Liste an weit verbreiteter Software die OpenSSL verwendet kann z.B. unter folgendem Link gefunden werden.

Was ist zu tun?

  • Als erstes müssen die eigenen Systeme auf eine fehlerbereinigte Version von OpenSSL aktualisiert werden (Version 1.0.1g oder neuer).
  • Danach neue Schlüssel für die Zertifikate erstellen. Jetzt ist es sicher das zu tun.
  • Überprüfen, welche fremden Dienste in den letzten zwei Jahren besucht worden sind.
  • Warten, bis dort wahrscheinlich der Fehler behoben wurde.
  • Dann (und erst dann) die Logindaten für diese Dienste erneuern. Vorsicht: Wenn das zu früh getan wird, also wenn der Dienst noch nicht bereinigt wurde, können die Daten wieder abgegriffen werden.

Pressemitteilung

CAcert-PM-Heartbleed-de

Update:

Es gibt eine Webseite, bei der man seit kurzem checken kann, ob eine Domäne angreifbar sind:
http://filippo.io/Heartbleed/ (Benutzung auf eigene Gefahr)
Wir haben unsere Systeme dagegen geprüft und es sieht so aus, als wären nicht alle, die wir als potentiell angreifbar eingestuft haben tatsächlich angreifbar, aber wir haben uns dennoch dafür entschieden die entsprechenden Systeme aufzurüsten und die Zertifikate zu erneuern.

Was wir tun:

  • Wir arbeiten daran, alle Infrastruktur-Systeme auf den neuesten OpenSSL-Stand zu bringen und für diese neue Zertifikate zu generieren.
  • Wir nutzen diese Gelegenheit, um dabei auf 4096er-Schlüssel, die mit SHA-512 signiert sind aufzurüsten. Die neuen Fingerabdrücke können oben gefunden werden. 😉
  • Wir werden alle Mitglieder kontaktieren, die in den letzten zwei Jahren aktive Server-Zertifikate benutzt haben.
  • Wir werden neue Informationen an dieser Stelle veröffentlichen.